Autumn 2014

Autumn 2014

Undergraduate  |  Graduate

 

Undergraduate


African American and African Studies
4921 Intersections: Approaches to Race, Gender, Class, and Sexuality (3)
            26118 R. Trimble TR 2:20-3:40 Evans Lab 2003
            **Cross-listed with COMP STDS 4921 and WGSS 4921
            Approved for majors only; minors must receive permission from the Sexuality Studies adviser
                before signing up.

Art Education
5835 Media Representations of LGBT Subjects (3)
          28344 J. Sanders TuTh, 7:05-8:25/7:05-9:35 p.m.  SU 131A

          Survey of social standpoints on visual culture and cinematic representations of (homo)sexualities
          through readings, film viewings, class discussions and presentations of independent research. As
          in past years registered students will be surveyed prior to final syllabus construction to ensure the
          most appropriate mix of moving texts (documentary, art-house independent works, widely
          distributed film releases, across the 20th and early 21st century) and readings curated in
          alignment with those films.
  

Comparative Studies

2214 Introduction to Sexuality Studies (3)
          17581 Staff WF 2:20-3:40 Smith Lab 3082  

 *4845 Gender, Sexuality and Science (3)
          17593 N. Jesser TR 9:35-10:55 Bolz Hall 0317
           **Cross-listed with WGSS 4845**

*4921 Intersections: Approaches to Race, Gender, Class, and Sexuality (3)
          17697 R. Trimble TR 2:20-3:40 Evans Lab 2003
          **Cross-listed with AAAS 4921 and WGSS 4921
          Approved for majors only; minors must receive permission from the Sexuality Studies             adviser before signing up.

Educational Studies: Counselor Education

4270 Love, Sex, and Relationships (3)
          12021 R. Dunn M 2:15-5:00 Baker Systems 0188

English
*2282 Introduction to Queer Studies (3)
          19257 J. Sha MWF 9:10-10:05 Enarson 0236
          **Cross-listed with WGSS 2282**

4564.04 Studies in a Major 20th-Century Author: James Baldwin (3)
          31846 K. Mitchell TR 9:35-10:55 Denney 0250

         Having lived from 1924 to 1987, James Baldwin witnessed some of the most tumultuous decades of the twentieth century, and he engaged them with a courage and conviction that makes the truth of his written and spoken words unmistakable to this day. Because he urged the United States to live up to its creed, he was relentless in his criticism of racism, sexism, and classism, and without "coming out" in ways that we easily recognize today, he challenged the nation's heterosexism and homophobia by highlighting the hypocritical definitions of morality on which they depend. In short, he was an extraordinary man who achieved prominence as an intellectual without all of the (unspoken) qualifications that open doors of opportunity: he wasn't white, wealthy, or heterosexual.      

James Baldwin was born in Harlem, New York to parents who struggled to make ends meet and often turned to religion to cope. Though less reliant on religion, he became a "boy preacher" at age 14. He left the pulpit at age 17, but his thorough knowledge of the Bible shaped his work throughout his life. By 1946 when he was 22, he began publishing essays that commanded considerable attention. Though he was beginning to find success as a writer, American racism led Baldwin to seek relief by leaving the United States to live in Paris in 1948. The next year, he published his first novel Go Tell it On the Mountain, which further bolstered his reputation and helped win him a larger audience as he continued to produce. After nearly a decade in France, Baldwin saw pictures of Dorothy Counts trying to integrate a school in North Carolina and being spit upon as she did so; this prompted him to return to the United States in 1957, and he became a national figure in the Civil Rights movement. Through it all, he continued to write, and his body of work includes essays, novels, short stories, plays, and poetry. As importantly, Baldwin was a public intellectual with a strong presence on television and radio and in the periodical press. Also, in 1978 and 1979, he spent some time in Ohio as a writer-in-residence and as a distinguished visiting professor at Bowling Green State University. 

This class will use this extraordinary man's life and literature as a way of understanding the time period in which he lived and wrote. We will work as an intellectual community, with everyone engaging new and sometimes different information and resources and sharing their findings with the rest of the group. As a collective, we will read some of Baldwin's most famous works, understanding that he was so prolific that we simply cannot cover his oeuvre in a semester. We will engage his non-fiction prose, with  readings from the essay collections Notes of a Native Son (1955), Nobody Knows My  Name (1961), and The Fire Next Time (1963); we will read his earliest novels, Go Tell It on the Mountain (1953), Giovanni's Room (1956), and Another Country (1962); and we will engage his work as a playwright via Blues for Mister Charlie (1964), which has disturbing resonances with our current historical moment, given the widely publicized trials of white men who killed black teenagers while many Americans, including those in the courtroom, pretended that race had nothing to do with the cases. 

Especially through students' research beyond the readings on the syllabus, we will also address Baldwin's interactions with leading figures of his day, including Martin Luther King, Jr., Elijah Muhammad, Marlon Brando, Harry Belafonte, and Richard Avedon and examine how his work engages literature by other authors, such as Shakespeare, Harriet Beecher Stowe, William Faulkner, Richard Wright, and Norman Mailer. In all that we do, we will keep Baldwin-an exceptional black man-at the center. That is, we will operate with the understanding that his importance does not emerge simply in relationship to others. Requirements: careful, consistent reading; thoughtful class participation; a scholarly annotation assignment; at least one presentation; a major research project.

4592 Special Topics in Women and Literature: Gender and Empire (3)

           19262 M. Farrell TR 12:45-2:05 Denney Hall 206

The colonization of the New World has usually been told as a “boy story,” with pirates or           explorers, shipwrecks or frontiers, as its characters and settings. This class asks what would happen if we put girls and women, homes and domestic spaces, at the center of that story instead. Reading literature from and about early America, we will look at the ways sex, gender, and families are inextricably bound up with appetites for expanding an Empire. Beginning by asking why Toni Morrison set her new novel A Mercy among women in colonial America, we will read a novel about Americans caught in the Haitian revolution written by Aaron Burr’s secret lover; ask why the first best-selling American novel, The Coquette, was about a sex scandal; and examine the persistent problems of gender and marriage in the work of Nathaniel Hawthorne.

 History

27311 History of Modern Sexualities (3)
          G. Torunoglu ONLINE course


3630 Same-Sex Sexuality in a Global Context (3)
          31891 D. Rivers TR 12:45-2:05 195 Knowlton Hall

         Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender History in the United States, 1940-2003
         This course offers an overview of LGBT culture and history in the United States from 1940 to 2003.
         We will use a variety of historical and literary sources, including films and sound clips, to examine
         changes in lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered lives and experiences during the last half of
         the twentieth century. The course will encourage students to think about intersections of race,
         sexuality, and class, and how these categories have affected sexual minority communities. The
         course will also explore the impact that sexual minority communities have had on the law and
         culture in the United States since World War II.

Human Development and Family Science
3440 Human Sexuality (3)
          10802 K. Miller TR 3:55-5:15 Hopkins Hall 0250

5440 Human Sexuality in Context (3)
          11554 A. Parker TR 11:10-12:30 Gateway Film Center House 4

Kinesiology: Sport Industry, Sport Management
 5614 Sport and Sexuality (3)
          10497 M. Wiser TR 3:55-5:15 PAES Building A0103

Psychology
2333 Psychology of Human Sexuality (3)
          24043 L. Cravens-Brown MWF 12:40-1:35 Lazenby 0021

4555 Adolescent Sexuality (3)
          24244 L. Cravens-Brown TR 12:45-2:05 Psychology Building 0002

Social Work
3597 Adolescent Parenthood and Sexuality: An International Perspective (3)
          12785 Staff W 5:30-8:15 Stillman Hall 0245
          12786 Staff W 2:00-4:45 Stillman Hall 0245
          12787 Staff R 11-1:45 Stillman Hall 0245    

5002 AIDS Survey: Facts and Issues (3)
          12809 and 12817 (combined section) Staff ONLINE course    

Sociology
 2340 Sex and Love in Modern Society (3)
          24505 Staff TR 2:20-3:40 Jennings Hall 0040

3435 Sociology of Gender (3)
          24523 Staff TR 3:55-5:15 McPherson Lab 1041
          Approved for majors only; minors must receive permission from the Sexuality Studies adviser
            before signing up

5605 Sociology of Sexuality (3)
          24690 J. Gray TR 3:55-5:15 Caldwell Lab 0137

Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies
2230 Gender, Sexuality and Race in Popular Culture (3)
          25366 A. Anastasia WF 5:30-6:50 University Hall 0090
          25367 J. Branfman WF 2:20-3:40 Jennings Hall 0160
          25368 M. Dean MWF 9:10-10:05 Enarson 0222

*2282 Introduction to Queer Studies (3)
          31826 J. Shaw MWF 9:10-10:05 Enarson 0236
          **Cross-listed with ENGLISH 2282**

3370 Sexualities and Citizenship (3)
          26401 S. Gabbard MWF 10:20-11:15 Caldwell Lab 0135

4404 Regulating Bodies: Global Sexual Economies (3)
          31432 M. Thomas TuTh 2:20PM - 3:40 University Hall 0090

          This course explores the regulation of women’s bodies and sexual practices in national and
          international contexts, including state regulation of reproduction, population control and migration
          of sexualized labor. This course counts as an elective for the Sexuality Studies minor and major.


4405 Race and Sexuality (3)
          31433 S. Winnubst W/F 12:45-2:05 Jennings Hall 0160

          
Placing the concepts of 'race' and 'sexuality' in the historical frameworks of colonialism, slavery,
          and 19th century science, we will draw on feminist, anti-racist and queer theorists, literature, and
          film to investigate how race and sexuality intersect in all our lives.
 

4527 Gender and Cinema: Women and the Horror Film (3)
          25378 L. Mizejewski TuTh 2:20PM - 3:40 Baker Systems 0136

          
Early feminist film theory criticized the horror film as a misogynist genre that punished female
          sexuality and identified women with monsters. But recent feminist film critics have produced
          more complicated explorations of this genre’s renditions of difference, sexuality, race, disability,
          and reproduction. This course draws on this new criticism to focus on
          the 
Frankenstein and Dracula traditions which have dominated the horror film.  Our approach               will equally emphasize social and psycho/sexual theories of horror. This course has been                       approved as an elective for the Sexuality Studies minor and major.*

4845 Gender, Sexuality and Science (3)

          25454 N. Jesser TR 9:35-10:55 Bolz Hall 0317
          **Cross-listed with COMP STDS 4845**

 *4921 Intersections: Approaches to Race, Gender, Class, and Sexuality (3)
          25451 R. Trimble TR 2:20-3:40 Evans Lab 2003
          **Cross-listed with AAAS 4921 and COMP STDS 4921
          Approved for majors only; minors must receive permission from the Sexuality Studies adviser
            before signing up.

       

 


Graduate


Note: Only those courses taught by instructors with a Ph.D. may count toward the GIS.  Please check with the relevant department, before enrolling, if you have any questions. In addition, only one course at the 4000-level can count for the GIS; check with the Sexuality Studies adviser (Debra Moddelmog) as to whether a 4000-level course will be appropriate for your plan of study before signing up.

African American and African Studies
4921 Intersections: Approaches to Race, Gender, Class, and Sexuality (3)
          26118 R. Trimble TR 2:20-3:40 Evans Lab 2003
          **Cross-listed with COMP STDS 4921 and WGSS 4921

Art Education
5835 Media Representations of LGBT Subjects (3)
          28202 J. Sanders TuTh, 7:05-8:25/7:05-9:35 p.m.  SU 131A

Survey of social standpoints on visual culture and cinematic representations of (homo)sexualities through readings, film viewings, class discussions and presentations of independent research. As in past years registered students will be surveyed prior to final syllabus construction to ensure the most appropriate mix of moving texts (documentary, art-house independent works, widely distributed film releases, across the 20th and early 21st century) and readings curated in alignment with those films.

Comparative Studies
*4845 Gender, Sexuality and Science (3)
          17593 N. Jesser TR 9:35-10:55 Bolz Hall 0317
          **Cross-listed with WGSS 4845**

 *4921 Intersections: Approaches to Race, Gender, Class, and Sexuality (3)
          17697 R. Trimble TR 2:20-3:40 Evans Lab 2003
          **Cross-listed with AAAS 4921 and WGSS 4921

8872  Religion and Sexuality(Seminar in Religious Studies) (3)
         31060 H. Urban WF 12:45-2:05 University Hall 0024

         This seminar will examine the intersections between religion and sexuality in a variety of historical
         examples and from a range of critical theoretical perspectives. Topics will include: marriage and
         gender in 19th century American movements such as the Mormons, Shakers and the Oneida
         community; the contemporary Christian ex-gay movement; sexuality and gender in contemporary
         Islam; transformations of sexuality in Hindu and Buddhist Tantra; the role of sexuality and
         feminism in modern new religious movements such as the Raëlians and Neopagan witchcraft; and
         other topics to be decided by class interest. Each of these topics will be accompanied by
         discussions of contemporary theoretical approaches to religion and sexuality, including the work            of Michel Foucault, Judith Butler, Gilles Deleuze, Sudhir Kakar, and others.


         The seminar will be a collaborative effort, based on close reading of texts and student-led
         discussions. Students will be expected to pursue an original research project on a topic of

         their own choosing which will be presented to the class for constructive feedback from the group.
         Each student will also be partnered with one or two others in order to read and comment on one
         another’s projects as they develop over the course of the semester.


Educational Studies: Counselor Education
4270 Love, Sex, and Relationships (3)
          12021 R. Dunn M 2:15-5:00 Baker Systems 0188

History

7630 Studies in the History of Sexuality (3)       
          31149 D. Rivers W 11:10-2:05 1150 Smith Lab

This graduate seminar is designed to give students a foundation in the history of sexuality in the United States. Readings will include classic texts as well as critical new work in the field and will cover U.S. history from the colonial period to the modern era, although there will be a heavier emphasis on the twentieth century. Topics will include: Native American and colonial sexualities; sexuality and slavery; gender and sexuality in the Victorian era; lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender history, sexuality and the family, the history of sexual violence, reproductive rights movements, and sexuality in American consumer culture. Throughout the course, we will look at the ways that categories of sexuality, gender, class, religion, nationality, and race intersect and mutually constitute each other.

Kinesiology: Sport Industry, Sport Management
5614 Sport and Sexuality (3)
          10497 M. Wiser TR 3:55-5:15 PAES Building A0103

Psychology
4555 Adolescent Sexuality (3)
          24244 L. Cravens-Brown TR 12:45-2:05 Psychology Building 0002

Sociology
5605 Sociology of Sexuality (3)
          24690 J. Gray TR 3:55-5:15 Caldwell Lab 0137

Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies
4404 Regulating Bodies: Global Sexual Economies (3)
          31432 M. Thomas TuTh 2:20PM - 3:40 University Hall 0090

          This course explores the regulation of women’s bodies and sexual practices in national           and international contexts, including state regulation of reproduction, population control           and migration of sexualized labor.

4405 Race and Sexuality (3)
          31433 S. Winnubst W/F 12:45-2:05 Jennings Hall 016

          Placing the concepts of 'race' and 'sexuality' in the historical frameworks of                               colonialism, slavery, and 19th century science, we will draw on feminist, anti-racist and           queer theorists, literature, and film to investigate how race and sexuality intersect in all             our lives.


4527 Gender and Cinema: Women and the Horror Film (3)
        25378 L. Mizejewski TuTh 2:20PM - 3:40 Baker Systems 0136

Early feminist film theory criticized the horror film as a misogynist genre that punished female sexuality and identified women with monsters. But recent feminist film critics have produced more complicated explorations of this genre’s renditions of difference, sexuality, race, disability, and reproduction. This course draws on this new criticism to focus on the Frankenstein and Dracula traditions which have dominated the horror film.  Our approach will equally emphasize social and psycho/sexual theories of horror. This course has been approved as an elective for the Sexuality Studies minor and major.

**4845 Gender, Sexuality and Science (3)
          25454 N. Jesser TR 9:35-10:55 Bolz Hall 0317
          **Cross-listed with COMP STDS 4845**

*4921 Intersections: Approaches to Race, Gender, Class, and Sexuality (3)
          25451 R. Trimble TR 2:20-3:40 Evans Lab 2003
          **Cross-listed with AAAS 4921 and COMP STDS 4921

7700 Feminist Theory (3)
          25379 M. Thomas Tu 11:15AM - 2:00PM University Hall 0286A

          Covers major interdisciplinary theoretical approaches used in feminist theory, including      
          intersectionality, queer theory, postcolonialism, political economy, disabiliy
          studies,
psychoanalysis, and critical race and ethnicity studies, among others. An examination
          of 
gender, sexuality, race, location and embodiment will be constant across all topics. Counts as
          an elective for the GIS in Sexuality Studies.

8820 Topics in Power, Institutions and Economies (3)
          31439 C. Rakowski M 2:15PM - 5:00PM University Hall 0286A

 In this course students will assess feminist debates surrounding how to theorize “violence” and how to combat it. These debates include 1) arguments surrounding whether specific practices constitute violence or not (i.e., sadomasochism, pornography, sex work/prostitution), 2) whether women can make use of “the master’s tools” (self-defense, weapons, the patriarchal judicial system, etc.) to combat violence against women and LGBTQI persons, 3) whether women’s participation in patriarchal forms of violence can empower them (i.e., militarism, self-defense with weapons), 4) the gendered nature of participation in extreme forms of violence (genocide, torture, suicide bombings), 5) racing violence through African American women’s experiences, and 6) “[trans]gendering” violence. .

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