Course Descriptions

 


[click on a department name to view relevant course descriptions, or scroll down for entire list]


African American & African Studies - Anthropology - Art Education - Classics - Comparative Studies
Education: Teaching & Learning - Educational Studies: Counselor Education
Educational Studies: Cultural Foundations of Education - Educational Studies: Higher Education and Student Affairs - English
History
Human Development & Family ScienceKinesiology: Sport, Fitness & Health
Ki
nesiology: Sport Industry, Sport Management - Law Psychology - Social Work - Sociology
Women's, Gender & Sexuality Studies


African American & African Studies

4535 Topics in Black Masculinity (3)

A theoretical analysis of constructions, perceptions, and performances of black masculinity locally and globally. Prereq: 3230, or permission of instructor.

  • [special for Autumn 2013]: This course provides an introduction to theories of black masculinities from various disciplines. We will explore: the development of the field; the key issues and debates; and new directions.  We will analyze a variety of cultural texts, social policy an legal history in order to consider critically how black men in the Americas have constructed identities and been represented in the public sphere. Course Flier [pdf]

4582 Special Topics in African American Literature (3)

Focuses on themes in African American Literature.  Topic varies.  Examples: Neo-slave narratives; the Harlem Renaissance; literature by African-American women.
[Prereq: English 2367.01 (367.01), or equiv, and 10 qtr cr hrs, or 6 sem cr hours of English at 2000-3000 level, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with 10 qtr cr hrs or 6 sem cr hrs for 4582 (582) or Eng 4582 (582). Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs. Cross-listed in English.]

  • [Special for Spring 2016]: "Studies in African American Literature: Baldwin, Lorde, and LGBT Liberation"

    James Baldwin (1924-1987) and Audre Lorde (1934-1992) were prolific writers who offered insights through several genres. Their artistic contributions continue to shape many people's understanding of the workings of capitalism, racism, sexism, and heteronormativity. Lorde famously dubbed herself a "black, lesbian, mother, warrior, poet" while Baldwin never claimed labels, but generations of artists, scholars, activists, and ordinary citizens (who find affirmation in their work) now celebrate them both as Black Queer Artists. This course will explore their contributions by sampling some of their most influential texts. Readings will likely include Baldwin's essays, novels, and one of his dramas as well as Lorde's essays, poetry, and her "biomythography" Zami. We will also likely end the semester with Janet Mock's Redefining Realness in order to consider how Baldwin's and Lorde's efforts in the 1940s through the 1980s helped make a path for more recent articulations of LGBT liberation.
     
  • [special for Spring 2014]: "Beyond the Spinster: Single Women & African American Literature and Culture"

    Long before Beyoncé’s musical anthem “Single Ladies,” African American writers considered the lives, loves, and legacies of unmarried black women. This course will study the representations of single women in African American literature and culture from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. By examining cultural works produced for, by, and about legally unwed women, we will pursue questions such as these: How do racial stereotypes about black women’s sexuality inform cultural representations? Why do the lives of fictional heroines usually end with marriage or death? Is it more than coincidental that many early black women writers were either widowed or never married? How can we account for the late 20th-century rise of “sista girl” fiction or “chick lit”?

    May include the following: Toni Morrison, Paradise; Nella Larsen, Quicksand; critical readings from black feminist theory; studies of popular film, TV and music and more…

4921 Intersections: Approaches to Race, Class, Gender, and Sexuality (3)

Examines intersections of race, gender, class, and sexuality in various sites within American culture (e.g., legal system, civil rights discourse, social justice movements).  [Prerequisite: Not open to students with credit for 545, Comparative Studies 4921(545), AfAmASt 4921 (545). Cross-listed in CompStd and AfAmASt.]

7759 Topics in African Diaspora Studies (3)

  • [Special for Fall 2015] "Black Queer Studies"
    This graduate level sexuality studies course engages queer studies from a Black Studies and an African Diaspora studies perspective. That is, we will take a diasporic approach in analyzing the relationship between sexuality, gender and Blackness. This course will start from the perspective that Blackness is an unstable identity rooted in a cultural, political, temporal and economic contexts that are oftentimes in conversation across geo-political boundaries. As such through taking a diasporic approach to understanding Black queerness and Black sexualities, we will engage key theoretical perspectives in the area of Black queer & Black sexuality studies by drawing upon work in this area from countries that are a part of the Black Atlantic region.

8840 Seminar in Black Masculinity Studies (3)

Engages different topics that address issues and concerns that pertain to black men and boys. Prereq: Grad standing.


Anthropology

3500 Primate Sexuality (3)

This is an advanced course: Anthropology 200 is a pre-requisite (students who do not have this prerequisite should contact the instructor for permission to register: guatelli-steinberg.1@osu.edu). Primate sexuality is an important area of research because it is integral to so many aspects of primate biology and behavior. It is clear why this is so: natural selection acts on the ability to survive and reproduce, and like most multicellular organisms, primates reproduce sexually. Research on primate sexuality not only enhances our understanding of non-human primate biology and behavior, but also provides a comparative context for understanding human sexuality and its relationship to human biology, behavior, and evolution. Aspects of both non-human primate and human sexuality explored in this course include but are not limited to: pre- and post- copulatory reproductive strategies of primate males and females, sexual behavior and response, sociosexual behavior, homosexuality, sexual dimorphism, hormonal effects on the brain and behavior, inbreeding avoidance, differential investment in offspring by sex, and the connections between life history strategies and sexuality. My primary objectives in teaching this course are for you to: (1) gain a deep appreciation of how integral primate sexuality is to primate behavior and biology and (2) develop insights into human sexuality in a comparative primate.


Art Education

5835 Visual Representations of LGBT Subjects (3)

Survey of social standpoints on visual culture and cinematic representations of (homo)sexualities through readings, film viewings, class discussions and presentations of independent research. [Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 835.]


Classics

3215 Sex and Gender in the Ancient World (3)

Introductory survey of women, gender, and sexual relations in the ancient Mediterranean world, especially Greece and Rome.  [Prereq: Not open to students with credit for Classics 508 or History 3215. GE historical study and diversity global studies course. Cross-listed in History.]


Comparative Studies

2214 Introduction to Sexuality Studies (3)

You may have heard the truism that sex sells, and certainly U.S. consumers are inundated with messages from a variety of sources that explicitly or implicitly reference sexuality. Somewhat less obvious is the role that ideas about sexuality play in issues of citizenship, healthcare, and economic well-being, as well as societal norms and habits of mind that influence everyday perceptions and decisions. This course will provide an introduction to sexuality studies through an interdisciplinary approach, examining a range of sexual diversity, including gay, lesbian, bisexual, transsexual, intersexual, heterosexual, and queer identities and desires. We will investigate how this diversity of sexuality is represented in law, religion, medicine, biology, literature and film. Through discussion and critical engagement with a variety of texts, materials, and images, the course will provide a chance to explore how various discourses affect how individuals interpret and represent their own sexuality. In addition, a fieldwork component will be included.

4845 Gender, Sexuality and Science (3)

Examination of relations between gender and science; topics include gendering of "science" and "nature," biological theories of sexual inequality, feminist critiques of science and technology.

4875 Gender, Sexuality and Religion (3)

Explores intersections of gender, sexuality and religion in comparative and cross-cultural contexts.  [Prereq: English 1110 (110) or equiv. Not open to students with credit for 515.]

4921 Intersections: Approaches to Race, Gender, Class, and Sexuality (3)

Examines intersections of race, gender, class, and sexuality in various sites within American culture (e.g., legal system, civil rights discourse, social justice movements).  [Prereq: One course in CompStd, WGSSt, or AfAmASt. Not open to students with credit for 545, AfAmAst 4921 (545), or WGSSt 4921 (545). Cross-listed in AfAmASt and WGSSt.]

5957.01 Comparative Folklore (3)

Comparative study of folklore. Topics vary, e.g., folklore and gender politics; theories of myth; folklore, memory, and history.  [Prereq: 2350, 2350H, English 2270, or 2270H (270). Not open to students with maximum qtr cr hrs for 677.01 and 677.02. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs.]

  • Autumn 2012 Feminist Folkore. In this course we will trace the various paradigms for studying women, gender and feminism in folklore and ethnography that have emerged over the last quarter century. After reviewing the foundations of feminist folklore in the 1970s and 1980s, we will pay particular attention to contemporary approaches, theories and projects that illuminate the relationships between performance, gender and power.
  • Autumn 2014 Gender and Traditional Cultural Practices. Folklorists have always studied gender, whether in research on women's lament songs or on men's work songs, but this research has only recently become part of discussions on sexuality, global feminism, or feminist ethnography.  Often the larger theoretical studies fail to account for local culturally-specific experiences.  This course is designed to bring the culturally specific research into conversation with the theoretical work. Topics include: gender and "traditional" cultural practices; representations of gender in folktales, ballads, jokes, dance, music, and other performances; and gender politics in everyday life including sexuality, social roles, and stigma.  Some of the issues to be discussed include the incompatibility of cultural relativism and feminism; global feminism and local cultural resistance movements; sexual minorities as folk groups, sexuality and gendered health practices, and feminist ethnography. This class counts as an elective for the Sexuality Studies minor and major. Crosslisted with English 4577.03.

8888 Interdepartmental Seminar in Critical Theory (3)

Interdisciplinary study of a movement or problem in critical theory. [Repeatable to a maximum of 15 cr hrs. Cross-listed in English, French, German, Spanish, and WGSSt.]

  • Spring 2013 NEW MATTER. Transgender & Queer Bio/Cultural Politics in the 21st Century Transgender and queer communities and subcultures have become visible in locations across national, regional, and transnational networks since the beginning of the 1990s. This graduate seminar explores recent shifts in queer and transgender practices of social identification and coalition, cultural production, and political activism, as signaled by new uses of critical frameworks that focus on biopolitics, affect, transnationalism, networks, mediation, nanotechnologies, risk, the phenomenological, the spectral, and the speculative. Through contemporary theories, media art, political organizing, social media, and literature, we will investigate the infrastructural transitions that have activated new re-imaginings of transgender and queer cultural politics and social identity.

    The seminar’s approaches to transgender and queer practices will presume that gender and sexual identity and expression always materialize in relationship to living histories of racialization, migration, and economic inequality. So we will emphasize materials and critical strategies that include racial, diasporic, neo/post-colonial, and class analyses and histories. The course’s broad focus on “new” 21st century critical frameworks (along with their related infrastructural conditions) through the lens of transgender and queer practices should be in sync with graduate students interested in lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer studies, comparative race studies, sexuality and gender studies, transnational and diaspora studies, social and cultural theories, poststructuralism, postmodernism, neo/post-Marxism, phenomenology, Third World and transnational feminisms, visual studies, and/or film, media, and communications.

    Seminar materials may include work by Sandy Stone, Jasbir Puar, Juana María Rodríguez, Roderick A. Ferguson, Susan Stryker, Gayatri Gopinath, Dean Spade, Kale Bangtigue Fajardo, Micha Cárdenas, Mel Y. Chen, Gayle Salamon, Martin Joseph Ponce, Eric Stanley & Nat Smith, Kara Keeling, Nguyen Tan Hoang, Sara Ahmed, Judith Jack Halberstam, Judith Butler, Saskia Sassen, Arjun Appadurai, Achille Mbembe, Cedric Robinson, Michel Foucault, Jacques Derrida, Gilles Deleuze & Félix Guattari, Fredric Jameson, Fred Moten, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Rey Chow, and/or Donna Haraway.

    Seminar requirements may include an in-class presentation, weekly responses through course blog, research proposal with bibliography in progress, and final research project.

Economics

4553 Economics of Population (3)

Using economic principles to analyze population growth, fertility, mortality, mating, dating, marriage, teen pregnancy, divorce, and migration. [Prereq: 2001.01, 2001.02 (200), or 2001.03H (200H), or 2002.01, 2002.02 (201), or 2002.03H (201H). Not open to students with credit for 553.]


Education: Teaching & Learning

7000 Sexuality and Education (3)

Examination of the role that sexuality plays in the US educational system. [Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 744. Cross-listed in EduPAES 7744.]


Educational Studies: Counselor Education

4270 Love, Sex, and Relationships (3)

[formerly EDU PAES 4270] Human relations training, including communication skills, conflict resolution, diversity training, and relationship enhancement.


Educational Studies: Cultural Foundations of Education

4215 Sexualities and Education: Issues and Practice (3)

[formerly EDUPL 4215] Examination of sexual orientation as an arena of diversity in K-12 and higher education as well as society.  [Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 415.]


Educational Studies: Higher Education and Student Affairs

2577 Crossing Identity Boundaries: A Journey Toward Intercultural Leadership (3)

Builds on intellectual and experiential engagement with issues of difference, diversity, social justice, and alliance building. Repeatable to a maximum of 12 cr hrs.

  • Autumn 2013: The Student Life Multicultural Center has developed a course that is built on intellectual and experiential engagement with issues of difference, diversity, social justice, and alliance building. In a multicultural society that is culturally diverse yet socially stratified, discussions about difference, community and conflict are important to facilitate understanding among different social and cultural groups. This course will explore a broad range of social identities. Crossing Identity Boundaries is focused on all aspects of social identity, including but not limited to race/ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, religion, socioeconomic status, and national origin. We will explore the topics of identity, social justice, and diversity through these various lenses. As we discuss and learn about different aspects of social identity, we will discuss the impact different social identities have on our understanding of the world. This section for the course will focus on masculinity and society.

    Overall, the course will be guided throughout by the following questions:
    1. How have you come to learn about race, gender, sexuality,and religion? How has this shaped your world view?

    2. In what ways can you use the information gained in this course to become an actively engaged, socially just global citizen within the Buckeye, Columbus, and greater communities?

    For more info visit go.osu.edu/CIB.

    To earn elective credit toward the Sexuality Studies major or minor, students must complete all assignments for this course on a topic related to human sexuality.

English

2282 Introduction to Queer Studies (3)

Introduces and problematizes foundational concepts of the interdisciplinary field of queer studies, highlighting the intersections of sexuality with race, class, and nationality. [Prereq: 1110.01 (110.01) or equiv. Not open to students with credit for 282 or WGSSt 2282 (282). GE cultures and ideas and diversity soc div in the US course.  Cross-listed in WGSSt.]

  • [Special for Autumn 2015 with Prof. Jian Chen: "Queer and Trans Politics of the Everyday"] This seminar explores queer and transgender politics from the emergence of counter-cultural protest, critique, and community building in the late 1960s to the networked and embedded practices, relationships, and identities of the first decades of the twenty-first century. As a derogatory term turned back against those using it, queer has been claimed as a perversely “negative” descriptive that rejects common-sense ideas of normality, while also creating different ways of desiring, relating, and being in the world. The course tracks the shifting social conditions that continue to energize queer dis-identification and ways of living as political strategies that work through cultural transformation. At the same time, the course resists the increasing codification of queer-ness through racial, class, and gender mainstreaming by focusing on the people of color, transgender and gender nonconforming, transnational, and economically dispossessed origins of queer politics. In particular, the embodied—or even biological—strategies of transgender and gender nonconforming of color and transnational politics are treated not just as newly emerging practices and movements. They are considered “foundational’ to queer politics and to the potential present and future of social transformation. Course requirements may include an in-class presentation, regular participation in a course blog, in-class midterm, and final paper project. Course materials may include work by Janet Mock, Lovemme Corazón, Ryka Aoki, Mia McKenzie, Nayan Shah, José Esteban Muñoz, Kobena Mercer, Judith “Jack” Halberstam and Del LaGrace Volcano, Michel Foucault, Mel Y. Chen, Beatriz Preciado, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, C. Riley Snorton, and Lisa Duggan and also film screenings. The course will fulfill requirements towards English, Sexuality Studies, and Women’s Gender & Sexuality Studies majors and minors. (Check with your program/department for more details.)
  • [Special for Autumn 2015 with Krista Benson: "Quaring and Transing Queer Cultures"]  This course will explore the past, present, and future of  queer and the field of  queer studies. As an interdisciplinary enterprise, the course draws on work in politics, philosophy, film, sociology, history, and literary studies to examine the ways that a politics of normalization has fed into multiple systems of domination, particularly in the United States. With its point of departure in feminist critiques of  sexuality as well as gay and lesbian studies, queer studies has expanded the interrogation of  identity to focus on many other culturally salient categories, such as race, class, religion, and nationality. Therefore, this course frames the introduction to queer studies through a “queer of color critique” and “critical trans* politics.” Course materials may include work by Lisa Duggan, Dean Spade, Kate Bornstein, Adrienne Rich, Gayle Rubin, Siobhan Somerville, Rodrick Ferguson, Andrea Smith, Chandan Reddy and others.

4550 Special Topics in Colonial and Early National Literature of the U.S.(3)

Focuses on themes and problems in literature and culture of colonial and early national U.S. Literature.  [Prereq: 10 qtr cr hrs or 6 cr hrs of English at 2000-3000 level, or permission of instructor. 5 qtr cr hrs in 367 or 3 cr hrs in 2367 in any subject is acceptable towards the 6 cr hrs. Not open to students with 10 qtr cr hrs for 550. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs.]

  • [Special for Autumn 2013: The Powerful Women of Early America] The first English poet in America was a woman. The first African American to publish a book was a woman. Women wrote America’s first English best-sellers, and long before Katniss Everdeeen became a folk hero, eighteenth-century readers gobbled up novels about female archers surviving in the American wilds. If there is any definitive origin for American literature (and we’ll be debating that), this class will show how women writers and powerful female characters are at the center of it. We’ll read Anne Bradstreet, Phillis Wheatley, narratives by women taken captive by Indians, a novel about a female Robinson Crusoe (The Female American), one about a real Connecticut sex scandal (The Coquette), and one written as a response to The Last of the Mohicans (Hope Leslie). In the process, we’ll try to separate fact from fiction when it comes to Pocahontas, and dispute whether we should care about Ben Franklin’s sister. Students will engage with emerging ideas of the time about which kinds of bodies have rights and how sexuality fits into those debates, especially with regard to colonialism. Consistent with the requirements of an upper-level English class, everyone will be required to participate, to lead class discussion, to complete short writing assignments, and to write a final research paper. Sexuality majors/minors should expect to focus their assignments on sexuality.

4577.01 Folklore I: Groups and Communities (3)

Study of folk groups/communities, folklore genres, issues/methods in folklore studies. How expressive repertoires shape identity, negotiate conflict, and process change in both established groups and new communities. Folklore Minor course.   [Prereq: 10 qtr cr hrs or 6 cr hrs of English at 2000-3000 level, or permission of instructor. 5 qtr cr hrs in 367 or 3 cr hrs in 2367 in any subject is acceptable towards the 6 cr hrs. Not open to students with 10 qtr cr hrs of 577.01. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs.]

  • Autumn 2012 Feminist Folklore Studies.  Folklorists have always studied gender, whether in research on women's lament songs or on men's work songs, but this research has only recently become part of discussions on sexuality, global feminism, or feminist ethnography.  Often the larger theoretical studies fail to account for local culturally-specific experiences.  This course is designed to bring the culturally specific research into conversation with the theoretical work. Topics include: gender and "traditional" cultural practices; representations of gender in folktales, ballads, jokes and other genres; and gender politics in everyday life including sexuality, social roles, and stigma.  Theoretical issues include the incompatibility of cultural relativism and feminism; global feminism and local cultural resistance movements; and feminist ethnography.

    This course provides students with an opportunity to explore many gendered cultural performances, from traditional practices to contemporary activities that are part of social change.  Topics include: gender and "traditional" cultural practices; representations of gender in folktales, ballads, jokes and other genres; and gender politics in everyday life including sexuality, social roles, and stigma.  Theoretical issues include the incompatibility of cultural relativism and feminism; global feminism and local cultural resistance movements; and feminist ethnography.  This course will be taught in conjunction with Professor Borland's Comparative Studies Course CS 5957.01 Feminist Folklore.
     
  • Autumn 2014 Gender and Traditional Cultural Practices. Folklorists have always studied gender, whether in research on women's lament songs or on men's work songs, but this research has only recently become part of discussions on sexuality, global feminism, or feminist ethnography.  Often the larger theoretical studies fail to account for local culturally-specific experiences.  This course is designed to bring the culturally specific research into conversation with the theoretical work. Topics include: gender and "traditional" cultural practices; representations of gender in folktales, ballads, jokes, dance, music, and other performances; and gender politics in everyday life including sexuality, social roles, and stigma.  Some of the issues to be discussed include the incompatibility of cultural relativism and feminism; global feminism and local cultural resistance movements; sexual minorities as folk groups, sexuality and gendered health practices, and feminist ethnography. This class counts as an elective for the Sexuality Studies minor and major. Crosslisted with Comparative Studies 4577.01.

4578 Special Topics in Film (3)

Examination of particular topics, themes, genres, or movements in cinema; topics may include particular directors (Orson Welles), periods (The Sixties), genres (horror).  [Prereq: 10 qtr cr hrs or 6 cr hrs of English at 2000-3000 level, or permission of instructor. 5 qtr cr hrs in 367 or 3 cr hrs in 2367 in any subject is acceptable towards the 6 cr hrs. Not open to students with 15 qtr cr hrs for 578 or 9 sem cr hrs for 4578 or 4578H. Repeatable to a maximum of 9 cr hrs.]

  • Spring 2013 RACIAL, SEXUAL INTERFACES. Film, New Media, Globalization This seminar explores shifts in visual practices, politics, and theories, with the transition from “old” to “new” media. The internet, computer, and networked digital technologies developed and popularized in the second half of the 20th century have radically altered image production, distribution, and consumption and also the politics of visual representation. This digital transformation is linked to cultural, economic, military, and political forms of globalization that define the same moment and which operate fundamentally through hierarchies of gender, race, and sexuality. We will focus in particular on the impact of digital media on film—the 20th century’s most celebrated and derided medium, art, and apparatus—and on the racial, gender, and sexual politics of cultural representation through moving images.  Course materials may include work by Ella Shohat, Wendy Chun, Kara Keeling, Lisa Nakamura, Toby Miller, Ting Wang & Nitin Govil, Chris Straayer, Celine Parreñas Shimizu, Mara Mills, Fatimah Rony, Linda Williams, Ed Guerrero, Bliss Cua Lim, Anne Friedberg, Laura Marks, Fernando Solanas & Octavio Gettino, Lev Manovich, Marshall McLuhan, Harry M. Benshoff & Sean Griffin, David Bordwell & Kristin Thompson, and/or André Bazin.  Screenings may include media by Tsai Ming Liang, Pratibha Parmar, Alejandro González Iñárritu, Isaac Julien, Gillo Pontecorvo, Robert Flaherty, Coco Fusco & Paul Heredia, Nguyen Tan Hoang, Park Chan-wook, Guillermo Gómez-Peña, and/or Julie Dash. Course requirements may include an in-class presentation, regular participation in a course blog, exploratory midterm project, and final paper project. The course will fulfill requirements towards English, Film, Sexuality Studies, Asian American Studies, and Women’s Gender & Sexuality Studies majors and minors. (Check with your program/department for more details.)
  • [special for Autumn 2013: From Exploitation Films to the Exploit] This course explores the cheap, low-culture sensation of exploitation films. As a class of films that became visible the 1920s in the U.S., exploitation films featured all that was considered excessive and prohibited under the Hollywood Hayes Production Code, including interracial relationships, sex, violence, non-heterosexual sexualities, single parent families, criminality, gore, the superhuman, and the supernatural. By the 1960s and 1970s, exploitation films became defined through specific genres targeting niche audiences, such as Blaxploitation, horror, sexploitation, martial arts, spaghetti westerns, gangster, and prison films. Hollywood's incorporation of exploitation's smaller scale, niche production and iconography and the growing international cinematic market contributed to this shift. Beginning in the last decade of 20th century, electronic networks and global Hollywood have helped to further absorb, disperse, and re-assemble exploitation films for hybrid transnational circulation. This course will track the development of the exploitation phenomenon alongside and within classical Hollywood cinema and then as a general feature of global post-industrial Hollywood and media.  Course materials may include work by Ana M. Lopez, Tejaswini Ganti, Toby Miller, Ting Wang & Nitin Govil, Yvonne Sims, Celine Parre?as Shimizu, Kara Keeling, Linda Williams, Ed Guerrero, Alexander Galloway & Eugene Thacker, Kyung Hyun Kim, N. Katherine Hayles, Wendy Chun, Henry Jenkins, Robert Rodriguez, Bliss Cua Lim.

    Screenings may include: Quentin Tarantino's Man with the Iron Fists, Melvin Van Peebles's Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song, Jack Hill's Switchblade Sisters, Robert Rodriguez's El Mariachi, Robert Clouse's Enter the Dragon, Danny Boyle's Slumdog Millionaire, Kim Ji-woon's The Good, the Bad, the Weird, Hideo Nakata's Ringu. Course requirements may include an in-class presentation, regular participation in a course blog, exploratory midterm project, and final paper project. The course will fulfill requirements towards English, Film, Sexuality Studies, Asian American Studies, and Women's Gender & Sexuality Studies majors and minors. (Check with your program/department for more details.) chen.982@osu.edu Undergraduate Major or Minor Course

4580 Special Topics in GLBT Literatures and Cultures

Focuses on themes and issues in LGBTQ literature and culture.  [Prereq: 10 qtr cr hrs or 6 cr hrs of English at 2000-3000 level, or permission of instructor. 5 qtr cr hrs in 367 or 3 cr hrs in 2367 in any subject is acceptable towards the 6 cr hrs. Not open to students with 15 qtr cr hrs for 580 or 9 sem cr hrs for 4580. Repeatable to a maximum of 9 cr hrs.]

  • [Autumn 2012: LGBTQ Transnationalisms.]  Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and other sexual and gender non-conforming people, identities, and cultures have been represented in contradictory ways in relationship to modernization and globalization. Using a comparative approach, this course will explore the new visibility of LGBT and sexual and gender non-conforming social movements, identities, and cultures in cities, nations, and regions that have become networked economically, politically, and culturally. Moving between political, historical, and cultural literature, film, and media, the course will focus possibly on LGBT and sexual and gender non-conforming visibilities in the U.S., Thailand, South Africa, Taiwan, Uganda, China, and Chile. The course will also look to local, diasporic, and regional queer and transgender critical approaches for potential interventions and subversions in dominant networks of visibility.  Course requirements may include an in-class presentation, regular participation in a course blog, exploratory midterm paper, and final paper project.

4581 Special Topics in U.S. Ethic Literature and Cultures

  • [Autumn 2012: Empire, Race, Sexuality.]  This course explores 20th ad 221st century U.S. ethnic literatures through the frames of U.S. empire, racialization, and sexuality. In what ways did U.S. imperialism--chattel slavery, westward expansion, overseas war and colonization, economic and cultural neocolonialism-produce racialized subjects? In what ways are processes of racialization simultaneously proceses of gendering and sexualization? How have Africa American, American Indian, Chicano/a, and Asian American writers engaged critically and creatively with such practices of racial and sexual subordination and territorial domination? What sorts of literary experiments haev they invented and used to claim cultures and communities of survival, renewal, and transformation? Possible authors: Deborah A. Miranda, Craig Womack, Toni Morrison, Thomas Glave, Shai Mootoo, Jessica Hagedorn, Nora Okja Keller, Ana Castillo, Mohsin Hamid. Requirements: attendance, partcipation, in-class work, presentation, short paper, final project.

4582 Special Topics in African American Literature (3)

Focuses on themes in African American Literature.  Topic varies.  Examples: Neo-slave narratives; the Harlem Renaissance; literature by African-American women.
[Prereq: 10 qtr cr hrs or 6 cr hrs of English at 2000-3000 level, or permission of instructor. 5 qtr cr hrs in 367 or 3 cr hrs in 2367 in any subject is acceptable towards the 6 cr hrs. Not open to students with 10 qtr cr hrs or 6 sem cr hrs of 4582 (582) or AfAmASt 4582 (582). Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs. Cross-listed in AfAmASt.]

  • [Special for Autumn 2015]: "Black Literature and Music"
    This course explores the complex relations between black literature and music. Why has music been so important, formally and thematically, to African American writers? In what ways have they drawn inspiration from and sought to emulate music’s artistic and political power? How have certain kinds of music become racialized as “black” in the first place? How has music come to represent a significant terrain for discussions of black authenticity? Less musicological or sociological than literary, our approach will focus on examining the ways that representations of music in the literature serve as critical sites where issues of race, culture, class, gender, sexuality, and aesthetics are staged and debated. Possible authors include Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. Du Bois, James Weldon Johnson, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Black Arts poets, Gayl Jones, Toni Morrison, August Wilson, Nathaniel Mackey, Harryette Mullen. Requirements: attendance, participation, in-class work, short responses, two papers.
     
  • [special for Spring 2014]: "Beyond the Spinster: Single Women & African American Literature and Culture"

    Long before Beyoncé’s musical anthem “Single Ladies,” African American writers considered the lives, loves, and legacies of unmarried black women. This course will study the representations of single women in African American literature and culture from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. By examining cultural works produced for, by, and about legally unwed women, we will pursue questions such as these: How do racial stereotypes about black women’s sexuality inform cultural representations? Why do the lives of fictional heroines usually end with marriage or death? Is it more than coincidental that many early black women writers were either widowed or never married? How can we account for the late 20th-century rise of “sista girl” fiction or “chick lit”?

    May include the following: Toni Morrison, Paradise; Nella Larsen, Quicksand; critical readings from black feminist theory; studies of popular film, TV and music and more…

7850.01 & .02 Seminar in U.S. Literatures before 1900 (3)

Topics include: American authors (Poe, Melville); history of genres, forms, and media (poetry, U.S. serial fiction); intensive study of 'periods' (the early Republic, the 1890s). [Prereq: Grad standing, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 850. Repeatable to a maximum of 12 cr hrs.]

  • [Special for Autumn 2013: Outbreak Narratives] How do our diseases make us who we are? Starting from the premise that epidemiology is a narrative form, this class will consider the ways stories about disease outbreaks from the transatlantic eighteenth century onward call national, racial, and generic categories into question. Beginning with Daniel Defoe's Journal of the Plague Year and Charles Brockden Brown's Arthur Mervyn, and ending with discussions of the AIDS pandemic and recent outbreak films like Contagion, we will collectively develop a critical framework for understanding why we feel repeatedly compelled to contain epidemics through narrative.  We'll be considering disease transmission, sex, germs and the limits of bodies, from the 17th century up through the AIDS pandemic.  Students pursuing the GIS in Sexuality Studies should plan to focus their assignments on sexuality.

7858.01 & .02 Graduate Seminar in U.S. Ethnic Literatures and Cultures (3)

Topics include: American authors (Poe, Melville); history of genres, forms, and media (poetry, U.S. serial fiction); intensive study of 'periods' (the early Republic, the 1890s). [Prereq: Grad standing, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 850. Repeatable to a maximum of 12 cr hrs.]

  • [Special for Autumn 2015: History, Empire, Sexuality]  This course examines the ways that U.S. ethnic writers since the 1960s have engaged with histories of U.S. empire, racialization, and gender and sexual violence. Why the prevalence of this historical impulse? What sorts of national and transnational pasts do these texts bid us to remember? How might queer of color and queer diasporic frameworks help us come to terms with these political, historical, and aesthetic questions? Possible authors include Gayl Jones, Toni Morrison, Craig Womack, Deborah Miranda, Jessica Hagedorn, Chang-rae Lee, Gloria Anzaldúa, Junot Díaz. Requirements: attendance, participation, leading class discussion, bibliographical work, final paper.

7879.01 & .02 Seminar in Rhetoric (3)

Special topics course: requires advisor approval to count for GIS.  Rhetoric of a particular period; major figures in rhetoric, rhetorical analysis of literature.  [Prereq: Grad standing, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with 10 qtr cr hrs for 879 or 6 sem cr hrs for 7879.01 or 7879.02. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs.]

  • Summer 2012: Human Rights Rhetoric: Testimony and Witnessing.  Whose struggles speak through human rights history and rhetoric? A rhetorical orientation to human rights suggests an emphasis on human rights history as a cultural system. To approach the history and practice of human rights as a struggle over meaning is to disrupt myopic narratives and to reveal the rhetorical mechanisms of assemblage and classification that structure human rights law and its translation into cultural forms. This course therefore foregrounds a view of rhetoric as forms of social-symbolic communication through which human subjects are incorporated into systems of value.  In focusing on human rights testimony and witnessing, this course draws attention to the truth-telling conventions and genres (photography, testimony, testimonial, autobiography, diary, and so on) that structure the history of human rights representations. Among the legal issues considered are shifting configurations of citizenship in an era of globalization; international laws on violence against women; asylum law and gay, lesbian and transgendered rights claims; constitutional freedoms (or lack thereof) in the US War on Terrorism.

    Readings span a range of genres, including theoretical and critical essays, legal declarations and case narratives, literary works, and documentary film/video. Students will be required to team-teach one class session, and write weekly responses and a final seminar paper. 

7890 Feminist Literature and Culture (3)

Special topics course: requires advisor approval to count for GIS. Analysis of literary and cultural texts through feminist methodologies. Time, period, and topic vary.  [Prereq: Grad standing, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with 20 qtr cr hrs for 892 or 12 sem cr hrs for 7890.01 or 7890.02. Repeatable to a maximum of 12 cr hrs.]
 
  • Spring 2015 Global Human Rights, Sexualities, Vulnerabilities. This seminar draws together feminist work in legal studies, queer studies, disability studies, literary studies, critical theory, and rhetoric through investigations of how the discourse of human rights maps vulnerability onto certain bodies--and how these bodies take on the burden of representation in US and international politics, law, and culture.
  • Autumn 2012 Feminisms, Biopolitics, and the Humanities.  In The Birth of Biopolitics, Michel Foucault theorized how modern regimes of governance discipline the social body through the assemblage of different forms of power. In this course, we will focus on the regulation of entire populations through the apparatuses of state violence, immigration and asylum law, reproductive medicine, neoliberal economics, and religious fundamentalism.  Even as new forms of transnational politics emerge, nation-states continue to flex their power in the governance of the bodies of women, minorities, and sexual subalterns, especially at the borders. This course draws together feminist work in legal studies, literary, rhetoric, and media studies, and considers how new forms of transnational political activism and cultural productions conjoin to contest the constrictions of state power and social injustice.
 

8888.01 & .02 Interdepartmental Seminar in Critical Theory (3)

Interdisciplinary study of a movement (phenomenology, feminism, deconstruction, etc.) or problem (intentionality, evaluation, etc.) in literary theory. [Prereq: Grad standing, or permission of instructor. Background in critical theory reccomended. Not open to students with credit for 890 or equiv. Cross-listed in CompStd, French, German, Spanish and WGSSt.]

  • Spring 2013 NEW MATTER. Transgender & Queer Bio/Cultural Politics in the 21st Century. Transgender and queer communities and subcultures have become visible in locations across national, regional, and transnational networks since the beginning of the 1990s. This graduate seminar explores recent shifts in queer and transgender practices of social identification and coalition, cultural production, and political activism, as signaled by new uses of critical frameworks that focus on biopolitics, affect, transnationalism, networks, mediation, nanotechnologies, risk, the phenomenological, the spectral, and the speculative. Through contemporary theories, media art, political organizing, social media, and literature, we will investigate the infrastructural transitions that have activated new re-imaginings of transgender and queer cultural politics and social identity.

    The seminar’s approaches to transgender and queer practices will presume that gender and sexual identity and expression always materialize in relationship to living histories of racialization, migration, and economic inequality. So we will emphasize materials and critical strategies that include racial, diasporic, neo/post-colonial, and class analyses and histories. The course’s broad focus on “new” 21st century critical frameworks (along with their related infrastructural conditions) through the lens of transgender and queer practices should be in sync with graduate students interested in lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer studies, comparative race studies, sexuality and gender studies, transnational and diaspora studies, social and cultural theories, poststructuralism, postmodernism, neo/post-Marxism, phenomenology, Third World and transnational feminisms, visual studies, and/or film, media, and communications.

    Seminar materials may include work by Sandy Stone, Jasbir Puar, Juana María Rodríguez, Roderick A. Ferguson, Susan Stryker, Gayatri Gopinath, Dean Spade, Kale Bangtigue Fajardo, Micha Cárdenas, Mel Y. Chen, Gayle Salamon, Martin Joseph Ponce, Eric Stanley & Nat Smith, Kara Keeling, Nguyen Tan Hoang, Sara Ahmed, Judith Jack Halberstam, Judith Butler, Saskia Sassen, Arjun Appadurai, Achille Mbembe, Cedric Robinson, Michel Foucault, Jacques Derrida, Gilles Deleuze & Félix Guattari, Fredric Jameson, Fred Moten, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Rey Chow, and/or Donna Haraway.

    Seminar requirements may include an in-class presentation, weekly responses through course blog, research proposal with bibliography in progress, and final research project.

History

2630 History of Modern Sexualities (3)

In-depth analysis of particular topics in the history of modern sexualities throughout the world; topic varies by semester.  [Prereq or concur: English 1110.xx. Not open to students with credit for 326. GE historical study.]

3215 Sex and Gender in the Ancient World (3)

Introductory survey of women, gender, and sexual relations in the ancient Mediterranean world, especially Greece and Rome. Sometimes this course is offered in a distance-only format.  [Prereq: English 1110.xx and any History 2000-level course, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for Clas 3215 (Classics 508). GE historical study and diversity global studies course. Cross-listed in Clas.]

3612 Asian American Women: Race, Sex, & Representations (3)

Examines the experiences and cultural representations of Asian American women for insight into race, gender, sexuality, and citizenship in U.S. society. Sometimes this course is offered in a distance-only format. [Prereq: English 1110.xx and any History 2000-level course, or permission of instructor. GE historical study and diversity soc div in the US course. Cross-listed in WGSSt 4401.]

3630 Same-Sex Sexuality in a Global Context (3)

History of same-sex love and sexuality in comparative geographical and chronological contexts. [Prereq or concur: English 1110 or equiv, and course work in History at the 2000 level, or permission of instructor. Not open to students with credit for 526. GE historical study course.]

  • [Special for Autumn 2013 & Autumn 2014: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender History in the United States, 1940-2003] This course offers an overview of LGBT culture and history in the United States from 1940 to 2003. We will use a variety of historical and literary sources, including films and sound clips, to examine changes in lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered lives and experiences during the last half of the twentieth century. The course will encourage students to think about intersections of race, sexuality, and class, and how these categories have affected sexual minority communities. The course will also explore the impact that sexual minority communities have had on the law and culture in the United States since World War II.

4010 Readings in Modern U.S. History (3)

Advanced readings on selected topics in Modern U.S. History. [Prereq or concur: English 1110 or equiv, and course work in History at the 3000 level, or permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs.]

  • [Special for Autumn 2013: Sex, Youth, and the Culture Wars] In the early twenty-first century, conflicts over sexuality, race, drugs, and gender are central components of U.S. politics and culture.  From the Daily Show to presidential campaigns, concerns about issues such as sex and violence in the media, same-sex marriage, and crime have periodically divided and united different groups of Americans.  This class will explore the origins of these debates, moving from the early twentieth century to the present.  In particular, we will discuss the powerful role of the market in shaping Americans’ cultural identities and producing “moral panics” over youth and family.  We will cover topics such as racial segregation, the entertainment industry, youth culture, gay and lesbian life, dating, pornography, drug prohibition, and social conservatism.  Over the course of the semester, we will ask: Why have Americans periodically expressed chronic anxiety about children and youth?  Are these concerns entirely new and what are their root origins?  How have Americans’ understanding of sexuality and race changed over time?

7600 Studies in the History of Women and Gender (1-6)

Readings course for graduate students focusing on the history of women and gender.  The course content will be international, emphasizing cross-cultural comparisons.  [Prereq: Grad standing. Repeatable to a maximum of 15 cr hrs or 5 completions.]

  • Autumn 2013. Sex, Race, and Empire: Readings in Women’s and Gender History
    This course examines the intersections of race and sexuality in the histories of modern empires.  Taking examples from the Americas, Asia, and Africa, we ask how the interplay of race and sex shaped relationships between colonizer and colonized populations, and consider how imperial racial and sexual legacies shaped anticolonial resistance and postcolonial nationalisms.

    Our readings will range widely across geographic contexts.  Students with specific thematic interests are encouraged to share them with me in advance of the semester.  We will be reading key works in the field by Laura Briggs, Antoinette Burton, Durba Ghosh, Charu Gupta, Philippa Levine, Ann McClintock, Tanika Sarkar, Ann Stoler, Luise White, and others. 

    If you have questions, please contact Sreenivas.2@osu.edu
     
  • Spring 2013. Racing Sex and Sexing Race.  Looking for some hot reading to keep you warm for the winter?  This graduate level course examines the connections between race and sex in modern U.S. History.  Through readings and discussions, we will analyze how the regulation of sexuality has historically been linked to efforts to create and control racial boundaries.  In addition, we will explore how individuals and communities both transgressed and reified these sexual and racial norms.  

7630 Studies in the History of Sexuality (1-6)

International and Interdisciplinary Readings in Sexuality History. [Prereq: Grad standing.]

8600 Research/Writing Seminar in Women’s/Gender/Sexuality History (1-6)

Autumn 2012. Why write alone when you can have the benefit of a supportive intellectual community?

This research and writing seminar provides the opportunity to start and hopefully complete a major research project (such as a M.A. paper, a dissertation chapter, or an article) related to the fields of women’s, gender, and/or sexuality history.

Our course will begin by examining a selection of historical scholarship and, if possible, conversing with the authors to help us:

1) conceptualize a viable research topic;

2) identify appropriate sources; and

3) develop methodological approaches and interpretive frameworks to analyze these materials.

Prof. Wu also will share her experiences in becoming a co-editor of Frontiers:  A Journal of Women’s Studies, which will be housed at Ohio State University in the History and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Departments for the next five years.

The remainder of the course will allow time for research, writing, and rewriting.  Students will gain the benefit of receiving regular constructive feedback from a supportive and collegial intellectual community.   The course will conclude with an optional mini-conference to provide an opportunity to present your work in a professional academic setting.

If you are interested in taking this course or have questions, please get in touch with me (wu.287@osu.edu) so we can discuss how the seminar can best support your intellectual endeavors.


Human Development & Family Science

3440 Human Sexuality (3)

Examination of the intellectual, physical, and social?emotional aspects of human sexuality.  [Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 670.02. GE soc sci indivs and groups course.]
 

5440 Human Sexuality in Context (3)

Examination of issues in human sexuality across the lifespan in the context of peoples' lived experiences within families, communities, and society, using film, texts, and narratives.  [Prereq: 2400 or 2410 or equiv, and Jr or Sr standing. Not open to students with credit for 370.]
 

8862 Seminar in Human Development and Family Science (3)

Seminar in Human Development and Family Science, topics to be announced. [Prereq: Grad standing, or permission of instructor. Repeatable to a maximum of 15 cr hrs.]

  • Autumn 2012: What Keeps Violent Relationsips Intact?  Violence in romantic relationships is a critical area of scholarly inquiry worldwide.  The World Health Organization's recent investigations showed that up to 71% of women in developing countries are the victims of domestic violence and suffer significantly compromised health coinciding with their experiences.  In the United States, 44% of women and 28% of men are the victims of such violence, with medical, mental health, and lost productivity costs exceeding $8 billion annually.  This course uses scholarly texts, audio-taped telephone conversations from violent couples, and other conceptual aids to examine the complexities of four scholarship areas within the larger inquiry of violence in romantic relationships.  The scholarship areas we will examine include:  1) definitions, measurement, and prevalence of violence in romantic relationships; 2) health consequences; 3) theoretical explanations; and 4) intervention approaches.  The course uses an applied approach to help students develop an in-depth understanding of the "quantifiable burden" and "characteristics" of violence in romantic relationships.  Use of audio-taped telephone conversations from violent couples will allow for a unique examination of how abuse unfolds in couples, including common instigators of violent arguments, how abuse continues to unfold conversationally even after the violent dispute is over, why couples stay in harmful abusive situations, and what theoretical constructs have the potential to prevent violence in these relationships.

Kinesiology: Sport, Fitness, & Health

2204 Sexuality and Health (2)

[NO LONGER BEING OFFERED, effective Summer 2013] [formerly EDU PAES 2204]The study of sexuality as an aspect of the healthy individual; the demythologizing of sexual beliefs and behaviors; sexual behavior and attitudes in young adults. [Not open to students with credit for 204.]


Kinesiology: Sport Industry, Sport Management
5614 Sport and Sexuality (3)

[formerly EDU PAES 5614] How conceptualizations of sexuality shape and are shaped by sport.  [Prereq: Jr standing or above. Not open to students with credit for 614.]

7744 Sexuality and Education (3)

[formerly EDU PAES 7744] Examination of the role that sexuality plays in the US educational system.  [Not open to students with credit for 744. Cross-listed in EduTL.]


Law

7610 Sexual Orientation and the Law (2-3)

This course will survey the various legal issues facing gay men, lesbians and bisexuals.

  • [special for Autumn 2013, 3 units]:  The topics include:  regulation of sexuality and gender; liberty-equality debate; theories of sexuality, gender and the law; the workplace; families; parenting; education; and the military.  Students will be expected to contribute actively to the class discussion.  Twenty percent of the grade will be based on class attendance and active participation.  The remainder of the grade will be based on a take-home exam.  Students will have the entire exam period to complete the take-home exam.  This is a general survey course.  No outside research is expected for class discussion or the take-home exam.  Nonlaw students can be admitted upon permission of the instructor, available at colker.2@osu.edu.
 

8896.12 Seminar: Sexual Violence and the Law (2)

Examines various theories of sexuality -- both cross-sex and same-sex -- and how they sit in relation to violence, injury, and law. [Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 796.21L.]


Psychology

2333 Psychology of Human Sexuality (3)

Overview of the psychology of human sexuality including the nature and variety of human sexual experience, theories and therapies regarding sexual issues. [Prereq: 1100 (100) or 1100H (100H). Not open to students with credit for 333.02.]

4543 Psychology of Gender (3)

An examination of the origins and implications of gender differences and similarities and the role that gender plays in the interpretation of behavior.  Prereq: 1100 (100) or 1100H (100H). Not open to students with credit for 543 or 543E.

4555 Adolescent Sexuality (3)

An examination of the psychological, biological, and social influences on adolescent sexuality. [Prereq: 1100 (100) or 1100H (100H). Not open to students with credit for 555.]


Social Work

3597 Adolescent Parenthood and Sexuality: An International Perspective (3)

Examination of the biological, psychosocial and cultural forces that influence adolescent sexual behaviors. International comparisons will be emphasized with respect to teenage sexual trends and national policies and programs. [Prereq: Jr or Sr standing. Not open to students with credit for 597. Not open to MSW students. GE cross-disciplinary seminar course.]

5002 AIDS: Facts and Issues (3)

A review of the physiological, psychosocial, legal, cultural, and educational issues surrounding the HIV disease and implications for social work practice. [Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 695.17 or 695.18.] Social Work 5003: AIDS: Psychosocial Aspects of HIV/AIDS has now been incorporated into this course and eliminated as a separate course.

5006 Integrative Seminars: Sexualities,Diversity, and Social Work (3)

Diversity of sexual identities, beliefs, behavior, and lifestyles are explored in the context of social work's mission, values, and ethics for professional practice.  [Prereq: Jr, Sr, or Grad standing. Not open to students with credit for 695.20.]

5016 Affirmative Social Work Practice with LGBTQ Individuals, Couples, and Families (3)

With focus on practice application, this course provides a comprehensive overview of the salient psych-social issues and life-course phenomena distinctive to the LGBTQ experience and affirmative interventions.  [Prereq: Sr or Grad standing. Not open to students with credit for 715.]


Sociology

2340 Sex and Love in Modern Society (3)

How behavior and meanings relating to sex and love have changed in recent decades; what explains these changes and the consequences of these changes.  [Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 340.]

3435 Sociology of Gender (3)

Analyzes multilevel processes that differentiate women and men in education, employment, and relationships. Examines variations in gendered experiences across race-ethnicity, social class, and sexuality.  [Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 435. GE diversity soc div in the US course.]

4635 Men and Women in Society (3)

Advanced seminar on the social and personal meanings of masculinity and femininity and variations across race-ethnicity, sexuality, and social class.  Examines gender as a social phenomenon and system of social practices.  [Prereq: 3 cr hrs in Sociol 2000-3000 (200-400). Not open to students with credit for 635.]

5605 Sociology of Sexuality (3)

A social and institutional approach to the study of sexuality with a focus in sexual identities, practices, institutions, communities, and sexuality movements.  [Prereq: 3 cr hrs at 2000-3000 (200-400) or higher level. Not open to students with credit for 605.]


Women's, Gender & Sexuality Studies

2230 Gender, Sexuality and Race in Popular Cultures (3)

Explores how popular culture generates and articulates our understandings of gender and sexuality and their intersections with race and class.  [Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 230. GE VPA course.]

2282 Introduction to Queer Studies (3)

Introduces and problematizes foundational concepts of the interdisciplinary field of queer studies, highlighting the intersections of sexuality with race, class, and nationality.  [Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 282 or English 2282 (282). GE cultures and ideas and diversity soc div in the US course. Cross-listed in English.]

  • [Special for Autumn 2015 with Prof. Jian Chen: "Queer and Trans Politics of the Everyday"] This seminar explores queer and transgender politics from the emergence of counter-cultural protest, critique, and community building in the late 1960s to the networked and embedded practices, relationships, and identities of the first decades of the twenty-first century. As a derogatory term turned back against those using it, queer has been claimed as a perversely “negative” descriptive that rejects common-sense ideas of normality, while also creating different ways of desiring, relating, and being in the world. The course tracks the shifting social conditions that continue to energize queer dis-identification and ways of living as political strategies that work through cultural transformation. At the same time, the course resists the increasing codification of queer-ness through racial, class, and gender mainstreaming by focusing on the people of color, transgender and gender nonconforming, transnational, and economically dispossessed origins of queer politics. In particular, the embodied—or even biological—strategies of transgender and gender nonconforming of color and transnational politics are treated not just as newly emerging practices and movements. They are considered “foundational’ to queer politics and to the potential present and future of social transformation. Course requirements may include an in-class presentation, regular participation in a course blog, in-class midterm, and final paper project. Course materials may include work by Janet Mock, Lovemme Corazón, Ryka Aoki, Mia McKenzie, Nayan Shah, José Esteban Muñoz, Kobena Mercer, Judith “Jack” Halberstam and Del LaGrace Volcano, Michel Foucault, Mel Y. Chen, Beatriz Preciado, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, C. Riley Snorton, and Lisa Duggan and also film screenings. The course will fulfill requirements towards English, Sexuality Studies, and Women’s Gender & Sexuality Studies majors and minors. (Check with your program/department for more details.)
  • [Special for Autumn 2015 with Krista Benson: "Quaring and Transing Queer Cultures"]  This course will explore the past, present, and future of  queer and the field of  queer studies. As an interdisciplinary enterprise, the course draws on work in politics, philosophy, film, sociology, history, and literary studies to examine the ways that a politics of normalization has fed into multiple systems of domination, particularly in the United States. With its point of departure in feminist critiques of  sexuality as well as gay and lesbian studies, queer studies has expanded the interrogation of  identity to focus on many other culturally salient categories, such as race, class, religion, and nationality. Therefore, this course frames the introduction to queer studies through a “queer of color critique” and “critical trans* politics.” Course materials may include work by Lisa Duggan, Dean Spade, Kate Bornstein, Adrienne Rich, Gayle Rubin, Siobhan Somerville, Rodrick Ferguson, Andrea Smith, Chandan Reddy and others.

2305 Gender and Sexuality in Global Perspective (3)

Investigates gender and sexuality in transnational and cross-cultural perspective.  Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 305.

2367.03 U.S. Lesbian Writers: Text and Context (3)

Writing and analysis of U.S. lesbian experiences, with emphasis on interdisciplinary relationships between literature and U.S. lesbian socio-political history. [Prereq: English 1110 (110), and Soph standing. Not open to students with credit for 367.03. GE writing and comm: level 2 and lit and diversity soc div in the US course.]

3370 Sexualities and Citizenship (3)

A survey of cultural, social, and political issues related to historical and contemporary lesbian experience in the United States.  [Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 370. GE diversity soc div in the US course.]
 

4404 Regulating Bodies: Global Sexual Economies (3)

The course explores the regulation of women’s bodies and sexual practices in national and international contexts, including state regulation of reproduction, population control and migration of sexualized labor. This course counts as an elective for the Sexuality Studies minor and major.

4405 Race and Sexuality (3)

Placing the concept of 'race' in the historical frameworks of colonialism, slavery, and 19th century science, we will draw on feminist and anti-racist theorists, literature, and film to investigate how race and sexuality intersect in all our lives.

4527 Studies in Genderand Cinema (3)

This course uses the tools of feminist film criticism to examine a variety of topics including but not limited to, female spectatorship, women’s film history, stardom, women and genre, representation of sexualities, women’s documentaries, feminist filmmaking, and the feminist avant-garde. Topics vary each quarter. 

  • Special in Autumn 2014: Early feminist film theory criticized the horror film as a misogynist genre that punished female sexuality and identified women with monsters.  But recent feminist film critics have produced more complicated explorations of this genre’s renditions of difference, sexuality, race, disability, and reproduction. This course draws on this new criticism to focus on the Frankenstein and Dracula traditions which have dominated the horror film. Our approach will equally emphasize social and psycho/sexual theories of horror. This course has been approved as an elective for the Sexuality Studies minor and major.

4845 Gender, Sexuality and Science (3)

Examination of relations between gender and science; topics include gendering of "science" and "nature," biological theories of sexual inequality, feminist critiques of science and technology.  [Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 535 or CompStd 4485 (535). Cross-listed in CompStd.]

4921 Intersections: Approaches to Race, Class, Gender, and Sexuality (3)

Examines intersections of race, gender, class, and sexuality in various sites within American culture (e.g., legal system, civil rights discourse, social justice movements).  [Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 545, CompStd 4921 (545), AfAmASt 4921, or 545. Cross-listed in CompStd and AfAmASt.]

5620 Topics in Feminist Studies (3)

Interdisciplinary in-depth analysis of selected topics in feminist research and interpretation. Topics vary. 
Special Autumn 2014: This course will examine the history and variety of masculinities produced and represented by American film, television, and music, with emphasis on the ethnic and racialized modes of these masculinities as well as the class values engendered by each.  Our topics will include female, gay, and queer masculinities.  This is an advanced seminar, so our focus will be the theorization of the pop culture texts we study, and students will be expected to make oral presentations of course material. This course has been approved as an elective for the Sexuality Studies minor and major.

7700 Feminist Inquiry (3)

Intro to women's, gender and sexuality studies as a field of study and an orientation to the program, facilities, resources, and people.

  • [Autumn 2014] Covers major interdisciplinary theoretical approaches used in feminist theory, including intersectionality, queer theory, postcolonialism, political economy, disability studies, psychoanalysis, and critical race and ethnicity studies, among others. An examination of gender, sexuality, race, location and embodiment will be constant across all topics. Counts as an elective for the GIS in Sexuality Studies. 

7710 Theorizing Race, Sexualities, and Social Justice (3)

Examines theories of difference based on race, ethnicity, nationality, sexuality, and class and the ways difference defines and modifies women's realities.  [Prereq: Not open to students with credit for 710.]

  • [Spring 2014] This course analyzes both foundational texts and current trends in the rich fields of scholarship theorizing race and sexuality.  We will focus particularly on the intersecting fields of queer studies, critical ethnic studies, and disability studies.  Throughout the course, we will explore the political, ethical and methodological dimensions of studying race and sexuality, particularly as historical and identity categories that intersect and constitute one another.

8800 Topics in Feminist Studies

Feminist studies on a variety of topics at the PhD level. [Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs or 6 completions.]

  • [special for Summer 2013: Publishing the Academic Article] Ever gotten feedback from a professor saying that your seminar paper should be published? Have a conference paper that enthusiastic audiences said should be published? Publishing the academic article can seem like a mystifying process, and yet more and more job search committees are requiring such publications of doctoral candidates who make their short lists for interviews and campus visits. For master's students, a published or forthcoming article could also greatly enhance applications for doctoral programs. In this workshop, we will take you through the steps of publishing your own academic article. Through peer review, group feedback, writing exercises, guest speakers, and your own writing commitment, the goal of the course is that you will have a publishable article to send out for review by the end of the summer, if not the end of the Maymester term.  [Note: Students must have a draft of a seminar or conference paper, however rough and incomplete, before class begins.]

8810 Topics in Race, Sexualities, and Social Justice (3)

Advanced in-depth studies in the theories of race, ethnicity, nationality, sexuality, and class. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs or 6 completions.

8820 Topics in Power, Institutions and Economies (3)

Special topics course; requires advisor approval for GIS credit.  Advanced study of variable topics relating to gender, power, and change, both theoretical (especially materialist) and practical.  Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs or 6 completions.

  • Fall 2012: Feminists Interrogate Violence. The objective of this course is to assess the structural and cultural factors associated with diverse forms of violence against women and theorizing about violence (with an emphasis on sexual assault, domestic and interpersonal violence, child sexual abuse).  We will analyze societal and women’s responses to violence, issues of women’s agency/vulnerability, key conceptual and legal tools, and specific strategies and policies used to defend women’s rights. We also will examine some key debates among feminists and non-feminists concerning, for example, contrapower sexual harassment, women’s violence against others, sadomasochism, pornography, and using the patriarchal state to defend women’s interests. This course focuses on the United States.  The course is conducted as a partnership between students and instructor.

In addition to students from WGSS, the course is appropriate for students in sexuality studies, sociology, social work, law, human ecology, public health, and others.  [Prerequisites: Graduate status & not have taken WS 750 (quarter version of the course)]

8882 Interdepartmental Studies in the Humanities (3)

Two or more departments offer courses on subjects of mutual interest. [Repeatable to a maximum of 6 cr hrs or 6 completions.]

  • Spring 2013 NEW MATTER. Transgender & Queer Bio/Cultural Politics in the 21st Century. Transgender and queer communities and subcultures have become visible in locations across national, regional, and transnational networks since the beginning of the 1990s. This graduate seminar explores recent shifts in queer and transgender practices of social identification and coalition, cultural production, and political activism, as signaled by new uses of critical frameworks that focus on biopolitics, affect, transnationalism, networks, mediation, nanotechnologies, risk, the phenomenological, the spectral, and the speculative. Through contemporary theories, media art, political organizing, social media, and literature, we will investigate the infrastructural transitions that have activated new re-imaginings of transgender and queer cultural politics and social identity.

    The seminar’s approaches to transgender and queer practices will presume that gender and sexual identity and expression always materialize in relationship to living histories of racialization, migration, and economic inequality. So we will emphasize materials and critical strategies that include racial, diasporic, neo/post-colonial, and class analyses and histories. The course’s broad focus on “new” 21st century critical frameworks (along with their related infrastructural conditions) through the lens of transgender and queer practices should be in sync with graduate students interested in lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer studies, comparative race studies, sexuality and gender studies, transnational and diaspora studies, social and cultural theories, poststructuralism, postmodernism, neo/post-Marxism, phenomenology, Third World and transnational feminisms, visual studies, and/or film, media, and communications.

    Seminar materials may include work by Sandy Stone, Jasbir Puar, Juana María Rodríguez, Roderick A. Ferguson, Susan Stryker, Gayatri Gopinath, Dean Spade, Kale Bangtigue Fajardo, Micha Cárdenas, Mel Y. Chen, Gayle Salamon, Martin Joseph Ponce, Eric Stanley & Nat Smith, Kara Keeling, Nguyen Tan Hoang, Sara Ahmed, Judith Jack Halberstam, Judith Butler, Saskia Sassen, Arjun Appadurai, Achille Mbembe, Cedric Robinson, Michel Foucault, Jacques Derrida, Gilles Deleuze & Félix Guattari, Fredric Jameson, Fred Moten, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Rey Chow, and/or Donna Haraway.

    Seminar requirements may include an in-class presentation, weekly responses through course blog, research proposal with bibliography in progress, and final research project.

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